Do coffee makers etc. use electricity when off?

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by Chris, Dec 20, 2005.

  1. Chris

    Chris Guest

    My girlfriend watched some show, I don't know which, & heard that
    thing like coffee makers & cordless kettles use electricity if they
    are plugged in, even if they're turned off.
    I know things like stereos need power for memory, or some coffee
    makers with timers need power for internal clocks, but do appliances
    like kettles & toasters still use electricity if they are off?

    Chris
    Chris, Dec 20, 2005
    #1
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  2. Chris

    James Sweet Guest

    Chris wrote:
    > My girlfriend watched some show, I don't know which, & heard that
    > thing like coffee makers & cordless kettles use electricity if they
    > are plugged in, even if they're turned off.
    > I know things like stereos need power for memory, or some coffee
    > makers with timers need power for internal clocks, but do appliances
    > like kettles & toasters still use electricity if they are off?
    >
    > Chris



    Not unless they have a clock or timer or some electronic control. If
    they have a standard rocker or toggle switch then turning the switch off
    turns it completely off.
    James Sweet, Dec 20, 2005
    #2
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  3. Chris

    Ralph Mowery Guest

    "Chris" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > My girlfriend watched some show, I don't know which, & heard that
    > thing like coffee makers & cordless kettles use electricity if they
    > are plugged in, even if they're turned off.
    > I know things like stereos need power for memory, or some coffee
    > makers with timers need power for internal clocks, but do appliances
    > like kettles & toasters still use electricity if they are off?
    >


    Not unless they have somekind of timmer or clock in them. Then they will
    use a very small ammount to keep the clock going.
    Ralph Mowery, Dec 20, 2005
    #3
  4. Chris

    Arfa Daily Guest

    "Ralph Mowery" <> wrote in message
    news:bb%pf.8405$...
    >
    > "Chris" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> My girlfriend watched some show, I don't know which, & heard that
    >> thing like coffee makers & cordless kettles use electricity if they
    >> are plugged in, even if they're turned off.
    >> I know things like stereos need power for memory, or some coffee
    >> makers with timers need power for internal clocks, but do appliances
    >> like kettles & toasters still use electricity if they are off?
    >>

    >
    > Not unless they have somekind of timmer or clock in them. Then they will
    > use a very small ammount to keep the clock going.
    >
    >


    All electronic / electrical equipment will draw tiny amounts of current when
    plugged in, irrespective of whether they have timers or clocks or double
    pole isolating switches in them. This is due to leakage in suppression
    components connected across the supply, insulation leakage, and capacitive
    leakage, which any AC powered equipment will exhibit.

    Obviously, we're not talking anything that your household electricity
    consumption meter is going to " see ", but never-the-less, enough to be
    measurable with sensitive test equipment.

    Arfa
    Arfa Daily, Dec 21, 2005
    #4
  5. Chris

    Ralph Mowery Guest

    "Arfa Daily" <> wrote in message
    news:SU2qf.2691$...
    >
    > "Ralph Mowery" <> wrote in message
    > news:bb%pf.8405$...
    > >
    > > "Chris" <> wrote in message
    > > news:...
    > >> My girlfriend watched some show, I don't know which, & heard that
    > >> thing like coffee makers & cordless kettles use electricity if they
    > >> are plugged in, even if they're turned off.
    > >> I know things like stereos need power for memory, or some coffee
    > >> makers with timers need power for internal clocks, but do appliances
    > >> like kettles & toasters still use electricity if they are off?
    > >>

    > >
    > > Not unless they have somekind of timmer or clock in them. Then they

    will
    > > use a very small ammount to keep the clock going.
    > >
    > >

    >
    > All electronic / electrical equipment will draw tiny amounts of current

    when
    > plugged in, irrespective of whether they have timers or clocks or double
    > pole isolating switches in them. This is due to leakage in suppression
    > components connected across the supply, insulation leakage, and capacitive
    > leakage, which any AC powered equipment will exhibit.
    >
    > Obviously, we're not talking anything that your household electricity
    > consumption meter is going to " see ", but never-the-less, enough to be
    > measurable with sensitive test equipment.
    >
    > Arfa
    >


    Sure they will. There is always some current being used. The resistance
    between the wires going from the wall socket to the device and across the
    switch insulation will use some current. Maybe a tenth to one microamp.
    Not really enough to call using electricity in a normal sense.

    Now for your next answer, tell us how many rat droppings are in a 5 lb bag
    of flour.
    They are there , that is why most of it is bleached.
    Ralph Mowery, Dec 21, 2005
    #5
  6. In article <>,
    says...
    > My girlfriend watched some show, I don't know which, & heard that
    > thing like coffee makers & cordless kettles use electricity if they
    > are plugged in, even if they're turned off.
    > I know things like stereos need power for memory, or some coffee
    > makers with timers need power for internal clocks, but do appliances
    > like kettles & toasters still use electricity if they are off?


    It depends on how it's turned on and off. I assume many newer ones use
    a relay and timer to shut it off after a certain amoutn of time so it
    doesn't start a fire. It depends on if the power switch directly
    switches the power or just tells some electronics to turn a relay on and
    off. You may need to take it apart to tell!

    --
    If there is a no_junk in my address, please REMOVE it before replying!
    All junk mail senders will be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the
    law!!
    http://home.att.net/~andyross
    Andrew Rossmann, Dec 21, 2005
    #6
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