D Cell battery current

Discussion in 'Electronic Design' started by Dutchman, Jul 19, 2007.

  1. Dutchman

    Dutchman Guest

    I have a Duracell D battery that has a voltage of 1.5V. I am curious
    on how much current I can expect to draw from this batter. Wikipedia
    shows that for a standard D cell alkaline battery the capacity is
    20500 (mAh). Does this mean that each battery should be able to
    provide 20 A h?

    My system draws about 1A so it should run for 20 hours? Unfortunately
    the battery doesn't seem to be giving me back that much current and I
    was hoping if someone could explain what is going on. In fact when I
    first power up my system there is a surger of current drawn and the D
    cells don't seem to handle that well.

    How can I figure how much current the D cell battery is rated to
    provided? I don't see anything on the packaging.

    If I need more current with the same batteries what should I do? Line
    them up in parallel? Will this double the current?

    Thanks for your thoughts.

    -Henk
    Dutchman, Jul 19, 2007
    #1
  2. Dutchman wrote:
    >
    > I have a Duracell D battery that has a voltage of 1.5V. I am curious
    > on how much current I can expect to draw from this batter. Wikipedia
    > shows that for a standard D cell alkaline battery the capacity is
    > 20500 (mAh). Does this mean that each battery should be able to
    > provide 20 A h?
    >
    > My system draws about 1A so it should run for 20 hours? Unfortunately
    > the battery doesn't seem to be giving me back that much current and I
    > was hoping if someone could explain what is going on. In fact when I
    > first power up my system there is a surger of current drawn and the D
    > cells don't seem to handle that well.
    >
    > How can I figure how much current the D cell battery is rated to
    > provided? I don't see anything on the packaging.
    >
    > If I need more current with the same batteries what should I do? Line
    > them up in parallel? Will this double the current?
    >
    > Thanks for your thoughts.
    >
    > -Henk



    http://www.duracell.com/oem/Pdf/new/MN1300_US_CT.pdf


    --
    Service to my country? Been there, Done that, and I've got my DD214 to
    prove it.
    Member of DAV #85.

    Michael A. Terrell
    Central Florida
    Michael A. Terrell, Jul 19, 2007
    #2
  3. Dutchman

    Phil Allison Guest

    "Dutchman"

    >I have a Duracell D battery that has a voltage of 1.5V. I am curious
    > on how much current I can expect to draw from this batter. Wikipedia
    > shows that for a standard D cell alkaline battery the capacity is
    > 20500 (mAh). Does this mean that each battery should be able to
    > provide 20 A h?



    ** Only if discharged over a long period - like 100 hours.

    Plus you call 0.9 volts the end.


    > My system draws about 1A so it should run for 20 hours?



    ** See the maker's data:

    http://www.duracell.com/oem/Pdf/new/MN1300_US_CT.pdf

    Be lucky to make 3 hours.


    > How can I figure how much current the D cell battery is rated to
    > provided? I don't see anything on the packaging.



    ** See the maker's data:

    http://www.duracell.com/oem/Pdf/new/MN1300_US_CT.pdf



    > If I need more current with the same batteries what should I do?



    ** Use a NiCd or NiMH rechargeable.

    A D size one of of them will give you 1 amp for 5 hours or more.




    ........... Phil
    Phil Allison, Jul 19, 2007
    #3
  4. Phil Allison wrote:
    > "Dutchman"
    >
    >
    >>I have a Duracell D battery that has a voltage of 1.5V. I am curious
    >>on how much current I can expect to draw from this batter. Wikipedia
    >>shows that for a standard D cell alkaline battery the capacity is
    >>20500 (mAh). Does this mean that each battery should be able to
    >>provide 20 A h?

    >
    >
    >
    > ** Only if discharged over a long period - like 100 hours.
    >
    > Plus you call 0.9 volts the end.
    >
    >
    >
    >>My system draws about 1A so it should run for 20 hours?

    >
    >
    >
    > ** See the maker's data:
    >
    > http://www.duracell.com/oem/Pdf/new/MN1300_US_CT.pdf
    >
    > Be lucky to make 3 hours.
    >
    >
    >
    >>How can I figure how much current the D cell battery is rated to
    >>provided? I don't see anything on the packaging.

    >
    >
    >
    > ** See the maker's data:
    >
    > http://www.duracell.com/oem/Pdf/new/MN1300_US_CT.pdf
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >>If I need more current with the same batteries what should I do?

    >
    >
    >
    > ** Use a NiCd or NiMH rechargeable.
    >
    > A D size one of of them will give you 1 amp for 5 hours or more.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > .......... Phil
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >

    Huh?

    Total energy storage of NiCd or NiMH is much less than primary
    batteries. Although higher current, time to discharge is much shorter.


    Lithium D's provide best energy density with high current.



    --
    Many thanks,

    Don Lancaster voice phone: (928)428-4073
    Synergetics 3860 West First Street Box 809 Thatcher, AZ 85552
    rss: http://www.tinaja.com/whtnu.xml email:

    Please visit my GURU's LAIR web site at http://www.tinaja.com
    Don Lancaster, Jul 19, 2007
    #4
  5. Dutchman

    Phil Allison Guest

    "Don Lancaster"
    Phil Allison wrote:
    >> "Dutchman"
    >>
    >>
    >>>I have a Duracell D battery that has a voltage of 1.5V. I am curious
    >>>on how much current I can expect to draw from this batter. Wikipedia
    >>>shows that for a standard D cell alkaline battery the capacity is
    >>>20500 (mAh). Does this mean that each battery should be able to
    >>>provide 20 A h?

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> ** Only if discharged over a long period - like 100 hours.
    >>
    >> Plus you call 0.9 volts the end.
    >>
    >>
    >>>My system draws about 1A so it should run for 20 hours?

    >>
    >>
    >> ** See the maker's data:
    >>
    >> http://www.duracell.com/oem/Pdf/new/MN1300_US_CT.pdf
    >>
    >> Be lucky to make 3 hours.
    >>
    >>
    >>>How can I figure how much current the D cell battery is rated to
    >>>provided? I don't see anything on the packaging.

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> ** See the maker's data:
    >>
    >> http://www.duracell.com/oem/Pdf/new/MN1300_US_CT.pdf
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>>If I need more current with the same batteries what should I do?

    >>
    >>
    >> ** Use a NiCd or NiMH rechargeable.
    >>
    >> A D size one of of them will give you 1 amp for 5 hours or more.
    >>
    >>
    >>

    > Huh?
    >
    > Total energy storage of NiCd or NiMH is much less than primary batteries.



    ** Utter bollocks.

    Go look up the data instead of citing fallacies.

    Recent AA NiMH cells have more capacity than AA alkalines.

    Sanyo NiMH D cells are rated up to 8.5 AH with a 10 amp discharge and 7 AH
    at 40 amp discharge.

    http://sanyo.wslogic.com/pdf/pdfs/HR-DU.pdf



    ........ Phil
    Phil Allison, Jul 19, 2007
    #5
  6. Dutchman

    BobG Guest

    The ma-hr rating is taken at a current that is 1/10th of the rating.
    You cold measure the short circuit current 'real quick' with a small
    resistance. You caould also time how long it takes to discharge thru a
    1 ohm R for example.
    BobG, Jul 19, 2007
    #6
  7. Dutchman

    Dutchman Guest

    Thanks for the great info guys!!! :)
    Dutchman, Jul 19, 2007
    #7
  8. "Dutchman" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I have a Duracell D battery that has a voltage of 1.5V. I am curious
    > on how much current I can expect to draw from this batter. Wikipedia
    > shows that for a standard D cell alkaline battery the capacity is
    > 20500 (mAh). Does this mean that each battery should be able to
    > provide 20 A h?
    >
    > My system draws about 1A so it should run for 20 hours? Unfortunately
    > the battery doesn't seem to be giving me back that much current and I
    > was hoping if someone could explain what is going on. In fact when I
    > first power up my system there is a surger of current drawn and the D
    > cells don't seem to handle that well.
    >
    > How can I figure how much current the D cell battery is rated to
    > provided? I don't see anything on the packaging.
    >
    > If I need more current with the same batteries what should I do? Line
    > them up in parallel? Will this double the current?
    >
    > Thanks for your thoughts.
    >
    > -Henk
    >

    Google the 'Peukerts effect' it applies to lead acid batteries, and in some
    cases can be applied to others.
    The limiting factor for discharge current is internal resistance.

    Cheers
    Martin Riddle, Jul 20, 2007
    #8
  9. Dutchman

    joseph2k Guest

    Phil Allison wrote:

    >
    > "Don Lancaster"
    > Phil Allison wrote:
    >>> "Dutchman"
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>I have a Duracell D battery that has a voltage of 1.5V. I am curious
    >>>>on how much current I can expect to draw from this batter. Wikipedia
    >>>>shows that for a standard D cell alkaline battery the capacity is
    >>>>20500 (mAh). Does this mean that each battery should be able to
    >>>>provide 20 A h?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> ** Only if discharged over a long period - like 100 hours.
    >>>
    >>> Plus you call 0.9 volts the end.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>My system draws about 1A so it should run for 20 hours?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> ** See the maker's data:
    >>>
    >>> http://www.duracell.com/oem/Pdf/new/MN1300_US_CT.pdf
    >>>
    >>> Be lucky to make 3 hours.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>How can I figure how much current the D cell battery is rated to
    >>>>provided? I don't see anything on the packaging.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> ** See the maker's data:
    >>>
    >>> http://www.duracell.com/oem/Pdf/new/MN1300_US_CT.pdf
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>If I need more current with the same batteries what should I do?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> ** Use a NiCd or NiMH rechargeable.
    >>>
    >>> A D size one of of them will give you 1 amp for 5 hours or more.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>

    >> Huh?
    >>
    >> Total energy storage of NiCd or NiMH is much less than primary batteries.

    >
    >
    > ** Utter bollocks.
    >
    > Go look up the data instead of citing fallacies.
    >
    > Recent AA NiMH cells have more capacity than AA alkalines.
    >
    > Sanyo NiMH D cells are rated up to 8.5 AH with a 10 amp discharge and 7
    > AH at 40 amp discharge.
    >
    > http://sanyo.wslogic.com/pdf/pdfs/HR-DU.pdf
    >
    >
    >
    > ....... Phil


    How about you bother to check the datasheet that presented previously. The
    alkalines were comming in at over 20 Ah.

    --
    JosephKK
    Gegen dummheit kampfen die Gotter Selbst, vergebens.  
    --Schiller
    joseph2k, Jul 21, 2007
    #9
  10. Dutchman

    Phil Allison Guest

    "joseph2k = Criminal Pile of Stinking SHIT "


    > How about you bother to check the datasheet that presented previously.
    > The
    > alkalines were comming in at over 20 Ah.




    ** Try ACTUALLY reading the FUCKING thing !!!!!!!!!!


    YOU vile slimy pile of autistic, psychotic


    KIDDIE ROOTING EXCREMENT.







    ........ Phil
    Phil Allison, Jul 21, 2007
    #10
  11. On Jul 19, 4:13 pm, Dutchman <> wrote:
    > I have a Duracell D battery that has a voltage of 1.5V. I am curious
    > on how much current I can expect to draw from this batter. Wikipedia
    > shows that for a standard D cell alkaline battery the capacity is
    > 20500 (mAh). Does this mean that each battery should be able to
    > provide 20 A h?
    >
    > My system draws about 1A so it should run for 20 hours? Unfortunately
    > the battery doesn't seem to be giving me back that much current and I
    > was hoping if someone could explain what is going on. In fact when I
    > first power up my system there is a surger of current drawn and the D
    > cells don't seem to handle that well.
    >
    > How can I figure how much current the D cell battery is rated to
    > provided? I don't see anything on the packaging.
    >
    > If I need more current with the same batteries what should I do? Line
    > them up in parallel? Will this double the current?
    >
    > Thanks for your thoughts.
    >
    > -Henk


    The "capacity" is totally dependent upon the load current and the
    voltage at which your system determine the battery to be "dead" at.
    So the capacity of a cell is *not* the same at different load
    currents.
    Look at the data and graphs for an Alkaline D cell:
    http://data.energizer.com/PDFs/E95.pdf

    For a *constant current* of 1A, an Energizer D cell will last just
    over 7 hours to 0.8V. If your device only works down to 1V per cell,
    then that drops to 3 hours life.

    Dave.
    David L. Jones, Jul 21, 2007
    #11

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